Five in a Row ~ Behind the Scenes of Owl Moon

2/18/2011
To help you understand how we use Five in a Row, I will give you some behind the scenes detail! The process I use for FI♥AR is very similar to Before FI♥AR.


Owl Moon is a Five and Row selection from Volume 2.

The first thing I do is select the book we will row. When I started planning for our Five in a Row adventure, I chose several books with a Winter theme to row this Winter.  For example, I chose: Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening, Owl Moon, Katy and the Big Snow and The Rag Coat. Owl Moon has a nature theme similar to Stopping by Woods, so I chose to row it next as an extension.

Which reminds me. I was asked about how often I plan. I typically make a general plan a year at a time, and then micro-plan seasonally, or a few books at a time. Check out Learning Together With Five in A Row and Learning Together With Five in a Row Part 2: More Organizing to see how I plan and organize (how I do what I do!).   

Note: This happened to be one of the books I did not have any activities pre-printed for since it is from volume 2. Pre-planning really helps!  With a new baby coming, I was only able to plan for one season (I am not on top of things like I was for B4FIAR!), so I will have to take another planning break this Spring!). 

After selecting the book, I read the manual and chose which lessons I wanted to cover. Five in a Row is extremely flexible ~ you can do any or all of the activities.

Owl Moon is about the experience of a young child who goes owling in the woods with her father.

For this book, I chose:

Social Studies: 

Setting - Woods - (so that I could tie it into our last book, and also because I could tie it into a real life experience ~ we have 22 acres of our own woods in Montana. Maybe they will ask to go owling the next trip we make?).

Self-Control, Bravery - these are character qualities the child demonstrated in the book and we discussed these ideas. I then look for opportunities in everyday life to reinforce these qualities. Often there are many chances!

Language Arts:

Metaphor and Simile - "The text is filled with phrases that help bring the sights, sounds and feelings to the reader by comparing them to other things that he has known or experienced," says author Jane Claire Lambert.  We talked about comparing one thing to another and looked for examples in the book as we read one day. For example, the snow looked "whiter than milk in a cereal bowl." My children could relate to that!  Note: I did not distinguish between metaphor and simile for this lesson. 

Art:

Trees and Shadows - we did not do the actual lesson in the book. Instead, we looked at the line and shape of the shadows made by the trees and the actual shape of the trees and discussed it.

This next activity is what I call a "go-along" activity, in other words, it was not suggested in the manual, but tied into the book.

To find "go-along" activities I search Homeschool Share, Google, or my Google Reader (ie other blogs), or look for activities in books. If I find it online I include a link to the activity. Otherwise, I mention the book it came from. Sometimes, I think of ideas on my own.  But, mostly I go looking for them!

Oh, which reminds me. . . I forgot the most important thing! After I choose which lessons I want from the manual, I read the book with the children together (often for the very first time!) and I ask them what they want to learn! Often this is how I come up with the best ideas!



Elli is still learning shapes, so I thought this would be a good project for her. For this activity, I showed her a picture of the owl and let her assemble the owl. I added the moon but didn't tell her where to put it. 


Elli is learning to write her name. We will work on writing "a" another time.

Math:

Units of Time - how many minutes in an hour, hours in a day.

Hours of Daylight and Dark - We discussed how the hours change with the seasons. In Winter, the days are shorter and the nights longer. I brought up the fact that in Summer, they go to bed when it is light and in the Winter they get to stay up after dark!

Science:

Woodland Habitat - Owls, rabbits, fox, birds, mice, raccoon, opossum, and deer are in the Northern pine woods of Owl Moon. Instead of making a woodland habitat poster as suggested in the manual, we read The Moon of the Owls, by Jean Craighead George. This is a fantastic book! It tells a story of the woodland animals in what I call a living science book! (This was not suggested in the manual ~ I found it looking for owl books at our library). 

Shadows - "Pa made a long shadow, but mine was short and round." We talked about what makes a shadow (light), what makes it long or short and then found our own shadows from the sunny window.

Note: I usually bring up other lessons for discussion while reading the book, but I don't formally touch on them all. 

Owls - we read Owls, by Gail Gibbons and made a collage. The collage activity was suggested for the Woodland Habitat animals, but I knew I had lots of pictures of owls, so this was easier.

Owl Collage


We found owl pictures in magazines and cut them out. Note: I found them in Birds and Blooms (a gift subscription from the kids' great grandma) and had them ready. 



Moon - we talked about the moon being the "lesser light to rule the night" and that it was created on day 4 with the sun and stars to be "for times and seasons."  We also reviewed the 8 phases of the moon and discussed how the Bible reckons the new months as new moons.  We then read Jump Into Science: Moon and did a moon activity from the book. 

In addition to reading the book, we watched the Owl Moon Video, which is the book being read aloud. The children followed along with the book. This also gave me a little break! 

Meteorite Cookies and Moon Craters


Same recipe that we used for our Snow Ball cookies, but this time they were meteorites. ;-)







Narrations:

This is not a part of Five in a Row, but I learned to do this my first couple years of homeschooling and I think it is so important! I love notebooking too, so I have them narrate the story to me and I type their narrations and have them illustrate them!

I then put a photo of the book, any written work, art work, lapbooks, etc into a 3-ring binder with sheet protectors for our portfolio.

This is more in-depth than I normally go into when I share what we are doing. Hopefully it has given you a good idea of how FIAR works for us!

Preschool Curriculum and Resources

2/17/2011

If you are looking for some guided learning resources to use with your preschooler, here are a few that I typically offer as a suggestion:

Before Five in a Row:
Before Five in a Row is "a treasury of creative ideas to inspire learning readiness." Geared towards ages 2-4, it is a literature based manual that contains activities to go along with each story. I used this with my 3 and 5 year old and had so much fun with it! We have now moved onto Five in a Row, which is geared toward ages 4-8. You can see our B4FIAR and FIAR posts to see more of what we do. Stay tuned for a detailed "Behind the Scenes" post to see how I pull a lesson together!

Heart of Dakota's Little Hands to Heaven Preschool:


Little Hands to Heaven in a Bible based preschool curriculum that includes:
  • letter recognition
  • letter formation
  • letter sounds and motions
  • early math skills
  • Bible activities
  • devotional topics
  • art projects
  • dramatic plays
  • active exploration
  • finger plays
  • music
Our Family for His Glory shares how much they enjoy this curriculum in Fun with Little Hands to Heaven and what their day is like in Homeschool- Little Hands to Heaven.

Kayla, from Our Family for His Glory, is excited to start
her preschool year with Little Hands to Heaven!
(Photo used with permission)
I have not used this curriculum, but I have been following their journey for awhile now and love what I see! I especially love how excited they are about using it. See more of their awesome preschool to get a feel for how they use Little Hands to Heaven. You can also check out the introduction and first week lessons to see more.

Raising Rock Stars Preschool:

Raising Rock Stars Preschool, created by Carisa at 1+1+1=1, is a Bible based preschool curriculum that is designed to provide a foundation for learning. It is not a complete program, but you could easily add your own themed based activities, learning toys, books and more to make it complete. And it's free! You just download the lessons and print them. Carisa also offers a paid member's only section that provides Power Point lessons to go along with the units.

Each unit includes:
  • Verse memorization and application
  • Manners and social skills
  • Letter Identification
  • Phonemic Awareness (sounds letters make)
  • Color Identification
  • Number Identification
  • Shape Identification (square, triangle, circle, oval, rectangle, heart, star)
  • Sizes (big, medium, small)
  • Dolch Sight Words (pre primer level) a, and, away, big, blue, can, come, down, find, for, funny, go, help, here, I, in, is, it, jump, little, look, make, me, my, not, one, play, red, run, said, see, the, three, to, two, up, we, where, yellow, you
  • Early Letter Writing Skills (proper pencil grip)
  • Fine Motor Skills-Cutting, Gluing, Coloring, Tracing
  • Print Awareness (following print, understanding that letters make up words, etc.)
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Vocabulary Development
  • Musical Awareness (learning new songs, exploring instruments, exposing rhythm, etc.)
  • Exposure to different fonts
  • Basic Computer Skills (through the use of the Power Point lessons)
See Introduction and Unit 1 and the sample lesson plan to see more!

Carisa also offers preschool printablespreschool packstot books, tot packsOpen ended learning toy suggestions and more!

Letter of the Week:


Letter of the Week and K4 Preschool, created by Erica at Confessions of a Homeschooler, is a preschool program that focuses on a "letter of the week." It is $10 for the packaged download, but Erica offers the individual letters free of charge on her blog!

Each A-Z lesson focuses on a particular theme and includes:
  • Weekly Bible Verse
  • Read aloud book suggestions
  • Phonics practice
  • Capital/lowercase letter recognition
  • 1-10 Numbers recognition
  • Counting practice
  • Colors
  • Shapes
  • Fine Motor skills: Lacing cards, cutting, coloring & pre-writing
  • Logic skills: Puzzles, size sorting, matching games
  • Large Muscle Movement: Large Floor Numbers/Letters Hopscotch
  • Singing: Leapfrog A-Z letter sound songs, Bible Verse Songs
  • Arts & Crafts for each letter
  • Daily Calendar and Weather Activities
This is an awesome resource if you want to do a letter of the week!

Preschool Corner {& 5K too!}


Jolanthe at Homeschool Creations hosts a weekly link-up called Preschool Corner ~ this is where to go for inspiration! You can find a list of blogs that participate and see what others are doing in their preschool corner.

Jolanthe also offers preschool printablespreschool packs and lots of encouragement! {I started blogging to participate in the Preschool Corner!}

These are just a few that are out there, but ones that I have seen in action. Do you have a favorite curriculum or resource that you think is over the top? Please share in a comment!
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Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

Pre-Writing

2/16/2011

Pre-writing, or writing warm-ups, are activities that strengthen the eye-hand coordination and fine muscle control needed for writing. They are a great way to get your preschooler ready for writing! 

Here is a list of pre-writing ideas that we have used:
  • Dressing: Have them zip, button, lace, and snap their own clothing.
  • Sewing: Have them sew with a large plastic needle and yarn. Button sewing is one of my favorites.

  • Drawing: Encourage lots of this and supply them with pencils, markers, crayons, chalk and more!
  • Tracing: We use sandpaper letters, Quilted Rag Letters and print.



  • Transferring: Transfer beans, popcorn, cotton balls, pom poms from one container to the next usung tongs or water using an eye dropper or turkey baster.
  • Cutting: Have them cut freely and also along lines and shapes they have drawn.
  • Folding: "Fold, press, flip" repeated over and over to make an accordian fan.
  • Stringing: String beads, buttons, Cheerios, macaroni or cut up straws.
  • Writing Devices: Keyboard, Typewriter, label makers, rubber stamp alphabets, magnetic letters...
Be adventurous and let your little ones create letters with pudding, rice, colored sand, cornmeal, whipped cream, finger-paint, clay, play dough, cookie dough, on a foggy window, in the dirt with a stick, or sky-writing (large letters in the air)  ~ the possibilities are endless!

I keep a box filled with different writing supplies to write on - stationary, card stock, printer paper, lined paper, sticky notes, pads of paper, mini- notebooks, index cards, scrap paper, construction paper, graph paper and more.  I like to keep a portable "Writing Center" for on the go. A zippered pencil case holds a small pad, index cards, pencils, colored pencils, scissors, and a glue stick. That way they can write anytime, anywhere!

We also have a large chalkboard, mini chalk boards and white boards for writing.

A few concepts from Ruth Beechicks book, The Three R's, that I will be implementing more with my preschooler include:
  1. Copying - I will continue to write models for her to copy.
  2. Dictation - I will dictate models for her to write.
  3. Creative writing - I will let her make up her own writings.
Most importantly, treat all those first writing attempts as real writing!
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Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

Quality Children's Literature

2/15/2011

Where do I find quality children's literature?

Book lists.

There are several lists out there that list quality children's books. The Read Aloud Handbook, by Jim Trelease is one that we own. I am particularly picky about what my children read, so we don't follow these lists whole-heartedly. But, they are a good source. I also look on curricular book lists ~ Sonlight for example. Of course, Five in a Row is a great place to look for timeless, quality children's literature. :-)

Do you have a favorite book list?




Some of our favorites books:

{Links below are to posts on my blog}

Books we've rowed:
Predictable books:
Picture Books:
  • The Beginner's Bible (Malachi's favorite)
  • Berenstain Bears (Eliana's favorite)
  • The Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh
  • The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit
  • Corduroy
  • Curious George
  • Make Way for Ducklings
Poetry:
  • A Child's Garden of Verses
Do you have a favorite timeless children's book? Do you have a favorite one from your childhood? I'd like for my little ones to look back with fondness on the books we read, but most importantly I want to instill in them a love for reading. 
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Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

Creating a Literacy Rich Home

2/14/2011

One of our goals in homeschooling is to teach our children how to learn so that they will be life long learners. I think this is best accomplished by creating a literacy rich home!


For me, this begins by talking to my children from birth, reading to my children, modeling reading, and providing a variety of reading and writing material.

While reading:
  • Show your child the title, author and illustrator
  • Point to the words while you read ~ your child will connect what you are saying to the words on the page and you will model left to right reading.
  • Teach the parts of the book (the cover, spine, etc.)
  • Discuss what you are reading! 
  • Tie in the book with experience. It's easier to understand a story about a farm if you've been there. You can tie in barn, silo, and tractor to your personal experience and bring the story to life!
In addition to books, you can enrich your home with print. You can can do this by reinforcing the print all around you, such as the print on a cereal box. Make a puzzle out of the front of the cereal box and put the puzzle in another cereal box for your child to put together. This reinforces the value of the print in your child's environment. Another idea is to label items in your home. Your child will connect that word to the item.

A note about A-Bee-See's: Teaching letter sounds is more important than teaching the letter names. Point out letters to your preschooler in the books you read and tell them the sounds the letters make. Have fun with learning the letter sounds with activities that reinforce what they are learning. See our Alphabet Fun series to see what we did!
    Do you have a special way to promote literacy in your home?
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    Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

    10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
    10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
    10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
    10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
    10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
    10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
    10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
    10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
    10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
    10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
    10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
    10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
    10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
    10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
    10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
    10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

    Create a Memory | Tot School ParTEA

    2/11/2011
    I am a scrapbooker by heart - ever since I was a child. I love photography and I love to capture memories. But it is also a special joy to create memories! It's purposeful and intentional and I love the joy it brings to my children!

    Recently, I wanted to create a special memory for Eliana since she turned 4 and "officially" graduated from Tot School. So, we had a Tot School Graduation ParTEA. This was my way of creating a memory and making the transition to "preschool" not only "official," but special.

    Here is what we did:

    Sugar Cube Tonging and Transferring



    Tea Spoon and Sugar Cube Race

    Good balance and coordination practice!
    And fun!
    Loose-Leaf Tea Spooning

    With her hand as a guide...
    Without... but it is wanting to help!
    Milk Pouring

    Filling the milk pitcher with cream.
    Measuring cream for a recipe. 
    Cookie Patterning
    Elli says the square ones are brownies, not cookies. :-)
    Pretend Play


    {I found this printable Paper Tea Set on Etsy.}

    Tea Time Play
    Tea Party Time


    Helping me set the table.


    Ready for the parTEA!
    We had:
    • Devonshire Clotted Cream 
    • Strawberries filled with cream ~ cut stem off then cut an x in the top of the strawberry almost to the bottom, and fill with cream.
    • Lemon Meltaways ~ a lemony version of the original recipe
    • Cream puffs
    • Short Bread Cookies 
    It was our first "real" tea party. We are the only girls in the family, too, so that made it even more special. She may forget (she is so young), but I am sure that the memory is imprinted on her heart.

    Make it special. Create a memory! {They grow so fast, make the most of each moment you have!}

    Tips for Success

    2/10/2011

    So far I have shared how you can create a rich learning environment for preschoolers by providing daily experiences, how you can help children build concepts through sensory exploration, and how you can help them make sense of the information they collect by giving them language to understand their discoveries.

    I gave you a couple ways to apply this concept using sand, water and paint play, but there are many more ways to provide daily learning experiences!

    Preschoolers love to help out around the house, so incorporate them as much as possible.


    I gave my preschooler a tray with a spray bottle filled with an all natural cleaner, paper towels, newspaper and terry cloth rags and let her clean the windows that she can reach.

    And of course, she loved helping out, especially with the spraying part. This summer, I will have her wash the windows outside so she can spray to her hearts content

    Whatever you do, they seem to want to do so have them work along side you when possible... or make the chore into a more toddler friendly activity.

    Here Eliana is "sweeping" up yellow split peas and using the dust pan to scoop them up and put them on the tray.


    Cooking is another one filled with lots of potential ~ measuring, scooping, pouring, stirring, rolling dough and more. Whenever I make bread, my preschooler is working right beside me with her own lump of dough. Practical skills are a wonderful way to provide experiences! 

    Note: Sometimes it can slow you down to have your preschooler help in the kitchen or around the house... sometimes, you just want to hurry and make this or do that (I speak from experience), but think of the EXPERIENCE they will get! I look at it as a chance to offer them that experience and consider the inconvenience a small price to pay.

    Here are a few tips to consider when working with your preschooler:
    • Encourage playful exploration. Give your child plenty of open-ended activities. The process, not the end product, is what matters.
    • Make sure the activity is appropriate for the child's age.  Does it hold the child's interest? Is your child engaged in the process? The best way to tell is to try it and see. If it doesn't, wait and try it again later. 
    • Assure success. Success inspires learning, so try activities that are challenging but not too difficult. Don't push. Guard that natural love of learning!
    • Let the discussion come naturally ~ play with them and talk about what you are doing, make an observation as you walk by, praise their efforts for whatever they are doing. 
    • Be patient. Let the child develop skills at their own pace. Respect their uniqueness. Don't rush. 
    • Instill a love for learning. Praise. Be enthusiastic about all their efforts. Learning is a joy! Convey that to your child!
    Tomorrow, I will talk about creating a memory!
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    Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

    10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
    10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
    10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
    10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
    10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
    10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
    10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
    10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
    10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
    10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
    10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
    10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
    10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
    10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
    10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
    10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

    The Art Experience: Paint!

    2/09/2011

    Art is a wonderful way for children to express themselves and children love to paint! This is my preschooler's all time favorite thing to do.


    Painting Supply List:

    {A good place to start!}
    • quality paper
    • coffee filters
    • spray bottles
    • droppers
    • sponges
    • scrapers
    • brushes - all kinds and sizes
    • newspaper brushes
    Newspaper brush
    • foam brushes
    Homemade foam brush.

    • massage rollers
    • paint rollers
    • squeegees
    • nylon sock filled with sand or salt. 
    Nylon sock filled with salt.
    • splatter screens
    • feather dusters
    • fly swatters
    Fly swatter painting.
    • straws
    • string
    • ribbon
    • bubble wrap
    Bubble wrap painting the letter B for My Blue Boat.

    • cotton swabs
    • sticks
    • corks
    • feathers
    • medicine droppers
    Drip drop painting during our Creation week
    • marbles
    • magnets and metal objects
    Magnet painting for the letter M
    • nature items
    • spools
    • dog toys
    • crayons
    • toy cars and trucks
    Tire track painting for our letter T fun.

    • liquid watercolor
    • tempera paint
    • kid paint
    • homemade paint
    • plexiglass (for on the table or on the wall for a smooth art surface)
    • butcher paper (cover the table and let them scribble, doodle and paint to their heart's content!)
    • vinyl table cover (to protect the surface of your table)


    Provide a variety of tools and materials so children can experiment and become comfortable with expressing themselves.  And don't forget fingers, toes, hands and feet!

    Do and Talk:
    • drip paint on paper and fold it in half 
    • use water color on wet paper
    • fingerpaint
    • dip string in paint then drag on paper
    • roll a marble in paint and then on paper
    • place a dab of paint on paper and move it around by blowing through a straw
    • paint with a variety of objects
    • use the objects to make prints
    • cut up dry paintings and paste them together to make a new picture
    • talk about what you are doing! 
    Excellent resources for more art experiences:
    Remember:

    The opportunities that you provide help build concepts, sharpen perception and build vocabulary! 

    Tomorrow, I will share a few tips for success when working with your preschooler.
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    Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

    10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
    10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
    10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
    10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
    10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
    10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
    10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
    10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
    10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
    10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
    10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
    10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
    10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
    10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
    10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
    10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

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